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‘Give us some bloody hope Scott!’: Father’s heartbreaking plea to the PM

A desperate father has broken down in tears as he delivered a heartwrenching plea to Prime Minister Scott Morrison.

Mark phoned Alan Jones from his property at Bourke, in north-western New South Wales.

The father of four’s call needs to be heard by every single Australian, right across the country.

“We’re a tough mob out here Alan. We put up with drought and we put up with dust storms but we always have hope.

“We’ve got no hope mate.”

Mark says the government has abandoned them, failing to do anything to future-proof the country against drought.

“Give us some bloody hope Scott! Tell us that you’re going to build a dam, tell us that you’re going to put a shovel in the bloody ground.

“We’re dying out here. My town is dying. The country is dying.”

Click PLAY below to hear the emotional call and Alan’s response

Mark revealed his children have moved away and don’t want to come home to the devastation that’s been caused by the drought.

The proud father broke down as he begged for something to be done.

“I’ve got four kids and three of them have moved away because we’ve got no hope out here. I want my kids to come home Alan.

“You’ve got him [Scott Morrison] on next week. Ask him. Tell him Mark in Bourke wants to know where his hope is.”

Alan says, “Mark has become a metaphor” for how serious this drought is, telling him just how important his call was.

“Mark, you’ve made a massive contribution to the cause because the emotion you demonstrated and the passion with which you spoke is emblematic of every farmer across this country.

“This is beyond desperate because the next step after desperate is death.”

National Farmers Federation CEO Tony Mahar weighed in on Mark’s heartbreaking situation, telling Steve Price it’s extremely disturbing.

“It’s sad, it’s devastating, this drought is crippling regional Australia.

“This is an extremely difficult and complex problem.

“No government in the last 100 or more years has been able to solve it.”

Click PLAY below to hear the full interview

Feature image: Generic (Getty/Ian Waldie) 

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