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Ferry fiasco ‘beyond a joke’ as glare issue renders new vessels inoperable

Article image for Ferry fiasco ‘beyond a joke’ as glare issue renders new vessels inoperable

Sydney’s new Indonesian-built ferries will only operate during the day, because a problem with night-time glare cannot be resolved. 

Operator Transdev says the existing Parramatta River and Sydney Harbour fleets will continue to run at night instead of the new River-class ferries.

NSW shadow transport minister Jo Haylen told Jim Wilson the number of issues with the new ferries is “beyond a joke”.

“Apparently there’s a defect in the glass, so the crew actually can’t see out the front windscreen safely without reflection in their eyes.

“The Minister has to answer these questions … ultimately, the buck’s got to stop with him.”

Press PLAY below to hear the full interview

NSW Transport Minister Andrew Constance was contacted for comment, but was unavailable.

In a statement, the Minister said:

“Customers will be able to see for themselves how great the new River-Class ferries are when they go into daytime service shortly.

“These ferries were designed and built by Aussie shipbuilder Birdon, with all of the design work carried out right here at home.

“On top of that, 70 percent of the total budget has benefitted Australian suppliers. We also had 54 local workers in Port Macquarie on the project.

“Transdev accepted Birdon’s recommendation for some overseas construction to occur. This was based on cost considerations and the ability to achieve safety criteria within the pre-COVID delivery timeframe.”

 

Image: Getty

 

Jim Wilson
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