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What ‘Super Tuesday’ means in the race to become Presidential candidate

Article image for What ‘Super Tuesday’ means in the race to become Presidential candidate

Things are looking good for Joe Biden on ‘Super Tuesday’, the key date in the race to become the Democrats Presidential nominee.

14 US states have gone to the polls today, voting between the five remaining candidates to take on President Donald Trump at November’s election.

Results are rolling in with US Correspondent Charles Croucher telling Deborah Knight things are looking good for former US vice president Joe Biden.

“That momentum that Joe Biden seemed to pick up with that thumping win in South Carolina has carried over, at least to the early states.”

Biden support is solid, picking up seven of the 10 states counted so far. This is a significant swing as he was trailing Bernie Sanders in many of these states just a few days ago.

Sanders has taken out his home state of Vermont, while billionaire Michael Bloomberg has picked up the tiny territory of American Samoa.

“That really is probably a little little for what Mike Bloomberg would have been hoping for. He’s, of course, invested about three-quarters of a billion Australian dollars in this election. Today is the first day on the ballot and so far not encouraging results for the former New York City Mayor.”

It looks like it’s coming down to a two-horse race, with Biden looking to be the favourite for moderates, while Sanders still holds the backing of the left-wing voters.

Click PLAY below to hear the full interview

Image: The Age

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